Home Farm Equipment Farm visit offers look at no-till, cover crops

Farm visit offers look at no-till, cover crops

[ad_1]

You usually flip to soil and water conservation personnel from numerous companies inside the Indiana Conservation Partnership for solutions when you’ve questions associated to cover crops and decreased tillage programs. Stephanie McLain, soil well being specialist with the Indiana Pure Assets Conservation Service, reasoned that if these persons are going to speak about and reply questions on such practices as “planting green,” they should see the observe unfolding firsthand.

Roger and Nick Wenning, Greensburg, Ind., agreed. So, on Might 24, McLain introduced a number of soil conservation employees and trainees to look at Roger and Nick plant corn right into a inexperienced clover cover crop.

“We frost-seeded it into wheat last year, then took hay off last fall,” Nick explains. “This field had dairy manure applied on it as well, and it didn’t hurt the clover.”

Three days earlier than planting, the clover was sprayed with burndown herbicides. It was simply beginning to flip its high leaves and blooms over as they ready to plant the sphere.

“We don’t always spray it ahead of planting, but our crops consultant wanted us to try spraying it first,” Roger says.

He additionally took time to clarify how every portion of the planter features to the guests. Their planter is a 12-row, twin-row Nice Plains planter. They just like the twin-row idea as a result of it permits them to go to larger plant populations. Their aim is often within the low 40,000-per-acre vary.

“We don’t use no-till coulters or residue wheels because we’ve found we don’t need them,” Roger says. Nevertheless, the Wennings put in disk openers with serrated edges in 2020 and imagine they assist reduce by means of inexperienced stems and residue higher.

Tweak the system

The Wenning are at all times on the lookout for methods to enhance their system, Roger says. Aiming for higher slot closure, they determined to attempt planting into just a few strips of mowed clover whereas the soil conservation personnel watched. They mowed two sections proper earlier than planting with a Bush Hog rotary mower.

“We’re looking for ways to ensure better slot closure, and our consultant suggested trying it,” Nick says. “When we try something new, we certainly don’t do it on the whole field. We did enough so that we could make a few passes with the planter. Then we can shell passes next fall and see if there is a difference in yield where we mowed versus where we didn’t mow.”

IN-THE-FIELD TRIAL: Roger Wenning mowed just a few strips on this clover cover crop discipline earlier than planting to see if it impacts emergence and early efficiency.

Nick additionally experimented with grazing only a few acres of the sphere this yr, utilizing electrical fence. His beef cattle grazed this spring. He can even be monitoring yields in these areas this fall to see if permitting beef cattle to graze earlier than planting had any impression upon yield.

Keep tuned for updates on how this discipline performs this season.

[ad_2]

Source link

Most Popular

Hemp transplanters: an agricultural technology breakthrough

Hemp has the potential to revolutionize many industries. With so many uses and benefits—from textiles, furniture, paper, clothes, biodegradable plastics, paint, insulation, biofuel, and...

Vegetable transplanters: an in-depth explanation of these automatic planter machines

Transplanters aren’t exactly a new agricultural technology. The first transplanter was a rice transplanter invented in 1898 by Heigoro Kawano. Transplanters for rice, vegetables,...

What’s new in tomato farming technology?

Tomatoes are one of the most economically significant crops in the world. It’s estimated that 188M tomatoes were produced worldwide in 2018. Tomato growers, on...