Home Crop Monitoring The Agronomists, Ep 33: Nathan Gregg and Peter Johnson on residue management...

The Agronomists, Ep 33: Nathan Gregg and Peter Johnson on residue management at the combine

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Ontario farmers are properly into wheat harvest now, although rain is holding issues up, whereas the west eyes an approaching harvest few are trying ahead to. As we shift to desirous about harvest, it additionally means it’s time to consider establishing for fulfillment for subsequent yr, and that begins at the combine.

Becoming a member of host Lyndsey Smith on this episode of The Agronomists is Nathan Gregg, beforehand of the Prairie Agricultural Equipment Institute (PAMI) and now farming full time, and resident agronomist and wheat lover, Peter “Wheat Pete” Johnson.

 

CLIP 1: Wheat Faculty: Giving Residue Management the Consideration It Wants

  • How do you discover that stability between blowing kernels out the again of the combine, however not lose the mild crop? Attempting to set the combine could possibly be tough this yr, particularly in Western Canada.
  • It’s important to work out whats the greatest bang to your buck.
  • We don’t have the sheer mass that we normally have throughout harvest time. How the crop behaves even inside the combine will likely be completely different. Make sure you actually examine these settings.
  • How do you unfold mud? Nicely, you don’t. It’s important to be taking note of what these rotor speeds are at. If it falls by means of the concaves, we’re overloading one system, and not using the different.
  • We need to stability that load.
  • Setting a combine might be black magic on a few of the better of days…
  • Humidity performs an enormous par, too.
  • It’s laborious to speak in generalities. You actually need to handle case-to-case.
  • Driving quicker isn’t all the time the resolution.
  • Getting the unfold width the identical as the header width doesn’t occur typically.
  • The rake take a look at. Pete explains midway by means of the video — it’s merely higher to not put into phrases.

CLIP 2: Canola Faculty: Managing residue for a profitable stand

  • We’ll say it once more. Slower pace = extra even unfold of residue.
  • Straw management ought to actually be completed in the fall if you’d like it to make a distinction in Ontario and Manitoba. Nevertheless, in the far west (the place it’s drier) there are just a few saving grace’s you are able to do in the spring.
  • We will see strips from residue years later. Greater than only one.
  • The drawback with residue isn’t simply nutrient management. It’s a soil temperature and soil moisture drawback. This provides illness and insect issues as properly.
  • It’s not simply the soil beneath your toes, both.

CLIP 3: Geringhoff corn header integrates crop safety at harvest

  • Europe has some cool know-how. Pete has horsepower on his Christmas record.
  • Everybody appears to have a unique rule of thumb in relation to corn residue management, particularly. It relies upon what you’re hoping to get out of your crop in the subsequent yr.
  • While you chop it into little items, there’s extra floor space for bugs.
  • It would possible be a sizzling and dry harvest. How can we keep uniform unfold, and mitigate hearth hazards? It may be opposing objectives, and could cause difficulties. Combine settings grow to be much more essential.
  • It’s tempting to say that possibly you don’t need to unfold the materials as far, however the penalties from a residue perspective are to not be ignored.
  • Don’t neglect the stripper header nonetheless will get quite a lot of chaff by means of the combine
  • Match your unfold width of your residue to the combine head!

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