Home Farm Equipment ‘Uber for farming’ connects farmers, service providers

‘Uber for farming’ connects farmers, service providers

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Whereas farmers would possibly know the names of different farmers of their county and surrounding space, they could not learn about customized providers different farmers present, or the right way to contact them. So, when a bit of apparatus breaks down, it isn’t at all times straightforward to know who to name or the right way to attain them. That is the place Farmmee is available in.

Created by tech trade veterans and entrepreneurs Becky McCrea, Cindy Rockwell and Molly Woodruff, Farmmee helps resolve these dilemmas by connecting farmers with different farmers who present these providers. McCrea, Woodruff and Rockwell all have backgrounds in IT and agriculture, and mixed their experience to develop the Farmmee app.

“We did some market research, and we found that nowadays, farmers don’t always know their neighbors,” says Woodruff, Farmmee’s CEO, who farms close to Indianola. “So if they have a piece of equipment that breaks down or they need custom work done, they’re not always sure who to call. Even though they might know their name, they might not have their phone number.”


USER-FRIENDLY: Molly Woodruff notes that the app was designed to be dynamic and simple to make use of. “A good example is, we knocked down a ton of hay, and there’s rain coming. Our baler just blew a bearing, and we need somebody to bale the hay,” she says. “This is a way to urgently, on the spot, put in a request to get the help that they need.”

“It’s a way to connect farmers with other farmers — not just for equipment breakdowns or issues, but also for planning ahead,” Woodruff provides. “Farmmee helps align the people that can provide that service with the farmer that needs the service to utilize equipment and maximize profit.”

The app, accessible in Android and iOS variations, breaks customers down into two classes: farmers and providers. Customers will be each, if desired. Farmers can checklist jobs they need assist with, from planting and harvesting, to hauling livestock, to baling hay, to agronomy providers and extra. Service providers can checklist the providers they provide. As soon as a farmer chooses a service, Farmmee finds providers utilizing ZIP codes and counties with GIS locators, so providers know the place a selected job is positioned.

App connects farmers, service providers

“When we did the market research, the farmers we were talking to called it ‘Uber for farming,’ and it’s that simple,” says Cindy Rockwell, Farmmee director of enterprise growth, who has labored in IT for over 30 years and beforehand labored as an IT advisor for a crop insurance coverage agency. “After you download the Farmmee app, you can say, ‘I can provide services.’ We’re trying to build a network of service providers as a young company just getting off the ground nationally. We’re really launching the app with it being free to everyone out of the gate.”

“Everybody that farms has equipment that they only utilize for a small period of time. If someone wants to make a little more money to make an extra payment on that equipment, whatever that might be, all they need to do is sign up as a provider of that service,” Rockwell says. “It lets you know who the people are that are in your proximity. You get a look at who that farmer is, what their need is from a commodity and service perspective — and we also have the farmer pinpoint with the map where their field is at, or where their hauling needs take place.”

Farmmee doesn’t take a minimize or proportion of the charges that providers cost. Customers are free to barter their very own phrases, circumstances and type of fee. This leaves farmers totally in command of the job and schedule. Farmers itemizing providers wanted can use the app at no cost, whereas service providers can checklist all of the providers they need for as little as $19.99 per thirty days. Nevertheless, for a restricted time, Farmmee is providing its providers at no cost to both celebration. Farmers may fee providers and supply opinions when jobs are accomplished, so there’s incentive for providers to carry out nicely.

“The app itself is always free to farmers. So if you need help and you say, ‘I need help,’ there’s no subscription involved,” says McCrea, Farmmee chief expertise officer.

McCrea notes the app was designed not solely to be user-friendly, but additionally to permit for well timed transactions.

“When you think about pushing an ‘easy button,’ you can go into the app and either choose ‘I need help’ or ‘I can provide help’ right off the bat,” McCrea says. “You can submit that job so you can be matched right away, so you can get help in a timely manner.”

“We wanted the app to be not only dynamic and easy to use, but also useful for planning as well,” Woodruff says. “A good example is, we knocked down a ton of hay, and there’s rain coming. Our baler just blew a bearing, and we need somebody to bale the hay. This is a way to urgently, on the spot, put in a request to get the help that they need.”

 

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