Home Crop Monitoring Very superstitious: Seeding and planting traditions

Very superstitious: Seeding and planting traditions

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Lots of athletes have superstitions, whether or not it’s not altering your socks throughout a event, by no means washing a hat, child powdering the tip of a hockey stick earlier than a face-off, or no matter it could be. A few of us in agriculture may be superstitious at occasions too, particularly in the case of the climate.

With climate being such an uncontrollable issue, we have a tendency to achieve out for any hope we will have — and generally that comes within the types of superstitions. Something to lure mom nature in the fitting path, proper?

A Farmer Speedy Fireplace on RealAg Radio tackles that very query: do you’ve any rising season superstitions?

Mark Torrey, of Woodville, Ont., says he pulls out all of the stops when he’s hoping for rain.

“I washed my truck, I took off the Tonneau cover, I washed the sprayer, left a bag of seed out on the lawn, and turned on the sprinkler last night because we are in a dry stretch again,” says Torrey. “I don’t think I’m necessarily superstitious, but you get into farming, and things can get tight. You’ve got to have everything on your side. Anything you can do, to coax a rain in, I’m probably going to do once in awhile. Or vice versa.”

Mark Huston, of Thamesville, Ont., says his farm superstitions preserve in line to a few of the issues he did as a baseball participant rising up.

“The only thing would be like baseball field, you try not to step on the corn rows. When you cross on to the baseball field, you try not to step on the line,” Huston says.

However, Randy Courtroom, of Plumas, Man., says they have an inclination to stray away from any form of superstitions on their seed farm.

“We tend to follow gut hunches, and we use a lot of professional people to determine where things are going. We do not follow these things, but a lot of our customers do, though,” Courtroom says. “They come in and say, ‘well, it’s going to rain on the 17th of May because thats when the hoar frost was six months earlier. There’s all those superstitions out there and I tend to avoid that. I tend to work off professionals and go with the way we think it’s going to go.”

Kristjan Hebert, of Moosomin, Sask., says that on their farm, their superstition is round a seeding deadline of Could lengthy.

“Part of it is that it just tends to be wet here in the last week of May, and part of it is I can remember being 16-20 years old, going to Kenosee Lake for May long. Every time I set the tent up, it rained for three days straight. So it just seemed like if you’re not done seeding by May long in our country, you could very well be June,” Hebert says. “I’m also a little superstitious when it comes to new moons and full moons. I don’t know, those two moons scare me when it comes to frost, but it tends to change the weather fairly significantly. Whether it’s in my brain or its real is another thing, that’s a good question.”

Todd Hames, of Marwayne, Alta., says for him, the superstition goes again a era.

“My Dad always said don’t start on Friday. So you know you’ve got to go out Thursday, and put the drill in the ground, and do a half a tank or something. The one thing that we certainly heard again this spring was seed in the dust and your bins will bust,” explains Hames.

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